The search for Australia and New Zealand’s most imaginative Toy-Con creator or decorator

A huge thanks to everyone who took part in the Nintendo Labo Creators Contest.

Each first prize winner per category will receive the grand prize: a custom-painted Nintendo Switch system.

The Teen/Adult Winners

Due to the exceptionally high quality of the finalists in the Teens/Adults category, an unprecedented tie was called for first-place, resulting in two winners for that category now receiving a grand prize each. As a result of this draw, we were pleased to upgrade one of the second prizes and will be awarding two first prizes in this category.

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“We were very impressed with a number of the finalists and the quality of their entries in the Teens/Adults category for Nintendo Labo Creators Contest AUNZ, and spent a long time determining an overall winner. It was so much fun to go through all of them, but quite tough to decide on the winner. After careful consideration however, we decided the first prize winner in this category to be a draw between The “Mario-nette” and Master Cycle Zero.”

First prize winners

The "Marionette"

by Nathan from Australia

Entrant's description:

“I am submitting a Toy-Con creation I'm calling the "Toy-Con Marionette". This Toy-Con works as a puppet you manipulate with wires with a Joy-Con in each of the puppet's hand to detect hand movement, and a Joy-Con R inside its head to detect when its mouth moves. It is painted to look like everyone's favourite moustachioed mascot because I couldn't resist the pun. To demonstrate the functionality of the Toy-Con Marionette, I created a simple dancing game and singing game in Toy-Con Garage. To play the dancing game, you move each of the hands to match one of three positions that is generated pseudo-randomly. The singing game uses the position of the puppet's right hand to control the pitch and the movement of its mouth flap to control the volume.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

"Combining a marionette with Joy-Con to create an entirely new controller is a novel idea and looks incredibly fun! You haven't just made a game that detects the movements of the Mario-nette, you've even made a second one that detects the opening & closing of the mouth too, to create not one, but two games where you match the movements to what's on screen. It's fantastic! You've made superb use of the IR sensors and produced a masterpiece that truly captures the spirit of Nintendo Labo. We're also really taken with your naming sense too!"

Master Cycle Zero

by Jordan from Australia

Entrant's description:

“I am submitting a custom decorated Motorbike Joy-Con. The Toy-Con is a 1:1 replica of the Master Cycle Zero from The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. The player can sit on the bike and play Mario Kart 8 Deluxe using the base functionality of the Motorbike Toy-Con. I was inspired to build it when I saw both the Master Cycle Zero and Labo Support added to Mario Kart 8 Deluxe. Thanks to the sturdy frame, the Toy-Con can be ridden, and the player can play Mario Kart 8 in Labo mode. In order to get the scale of the bike right, I took screenshots from my Nintendo Switch and blew them up to a 1:1 scale. From there I cut out pieces and used them as reference art, similarly to how real 3D models are made for games. The whole process took over 100 hours to build, and I loved every second of it.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

"We were completely blown away by the sheer scale, complexity, and faithfulness of this life-size reproduction of the Master Cycle Zero. If that wasn't enough, it has a headlight, and even includes a customised Toy-Con Motorbike, so you can ride exactly the same motorbike in-game too! We'd love to take it for a spin!"

Second Prize Winners

Toy-Con Blaster

by Kristian from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“The Toy-Con Blaster is a tabletop device which shoots IR beams at IR markers (its targets) to score points. It is an arcade game in which you need to try and earn as many point as you can within 90 seconds using the shooting-gallery component.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

"We love the design of this piece. There are some great touches including a spring stand that lets it work on all kinds of surfaces, the ability to aim at your targets with the scope, and support for left and right-handed players. We especially liked how targets appear out of all sorts of different places. This definitely looks like a lot of fun to play with two people!"

Game & Watch Game “Judge”

by Matthew from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“My Toy-Con Garage Creation is an adaptation of the original Nintendo Game & Watch “Judge”. A hint of nostalgia in a fun and fast paced game to play with friends. The game begins by either player pushing down on the analog stick to start the round. After the count of three as the bell tone rings players will begin to charge their flag by rapidly shaking their Joy-Con. Once you have charged your flag you will then have opportunity to strike at your opponent by pressing the button in their direction on your DPad; a successful hit will score one point and the round will restart. Both players have opportunity to dodge any incoming attacks adding another element of difficulty; one of timing to the game. The first player to reach four points is the winner and will receive a short tone of applause. To clear the current game and restart you simply give the console a light shake. Thank you and I hope everyone can enjoy my creation as much as I enjoyed making it.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

"It's already quite impressive to have reproduced Game & Watch with Nintendo Labo. Not only have you done that, but you've added a new, fun twist with the Joy-Con shaking mechanic. We like how you've made the game more interesting by also including the ability to dodge in addition to striking. You've used a stencil to produce a great customisation of the screen, making the characters look like they are actually moving. This is an outstanding piece where you can clearly see the attention that's been paid to detail. We'd love to play it!"

Wah Machine

by Colin from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“A Toy-Con Garage creation combining a modification of the piano to create a frantic hardware based minigame that can be combined with a bizarre hybrid of multiple generations of Nintendo by replacing the Wii motion sensor bar with a Nintendo Switch Joy-Con infrared light to essentially build a Nintendo playing arcade cabinet.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“This is a brilliant mashup of Toy-Con Piano and House that takes some of the best parts of both. The game you've made with Toy-Con Garage looks fairly straight forward and a lot of fun to play too. To top it off though, you've managed to make all of this work with a Wii game by using the IR sensor to move the Wii Remote pointer! Although we knew it was theoretically possible to use the IR sensor in place of the Sensor Bar, you've actually tried experimenting with this with a Toy-Con! Not even the other developers here had tried that before! You've given us a new technical insight for which we are exceedingly grateful!"

Cardboard Poltergust 5000

by Aaron from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“This is my submission video to the Nintendo Labo Creators Contest (AUNZ 2018).The Poltergust Toy-Con allows for hide-and-seek game modes where players can find/catch Ghosts around the house. This build uses two Joy-Con (Left and Right) as well as the Nintendo Switch Console. The build was done with primarily cardboard, duct tape, some postal tubes, belts and pipe. I got Nintendo Labo as I am currently in school for Game Design and I wanted to challenge myself to create a game experience using the Toy-Con Garage. Thanks for watching!”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“We are really impressed with the size of this one! You've done a great job creating this Poltergust! Not only is this a first-rate customisation, you've managed to include both Joy-Con and the console screen to create a realistic Poltergust complete with ghost-catching functionality. We'd love to try catching some ghosts with this!"

The Kids Winners

First Prize Winner

Elephant Marble Game

by Jamie from New Zealand

Entrant’s description:

“I created my own Toy-Con, get all five marbles in the hoop to win.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“You've done an excellent job inventing this marble game with Toy-Con! The elephant was a great idea and makes the game really appealing to look at! You've done a great job using the different Joy-Con features: the IR sensor to detect whether the marbles went into the elephant, and HD Rumble to first release the marbles from the dispenser. Your idea to throw marbles into the back of the elephant is novel and we'd love to try it out ourselves!”

Second Prize Winners

Toy-Con Drum Kit

by Taj from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“I have made a Toy-Con Drum Kit with a pedal and drumstick (Toy-Con Garage Creation).”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“You've done a great job creating such a large set of drums! It even comes with a pedal too making it an authentic reproduction. The mechanic is fairly straightforward—you shake the Toy-Con to produce a sound—yet it's a perfect fit for use with drums. We would have really loved to see you playing this!”

SNES Motorbike

by Benjamin from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“Ben painted his motorbike Toy-Con based on an SNES console he owns. It took him a long time but he managed to pull it off (in his words). He is very proud of his entry.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“This is an excellent combination of SNES and Toy-Con Motorbike! You've clearly captured the look of the SNES and have produced a pleasing customisation of the whole motorbike. We really liked your idea of revealing some circuitry when taking out the screen holder and we can feel the craftsmanship that went into the paintwork!”

Paper Mario House

by Clayton from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“I am submitting a customised Labo House, that is supposed to resemble Paper Mario’s house from Paper Mario. My brother and I have designed the button to look like the spring from Super Mario Bros., the key to look like the (American) Super Mario Bros. 2 lock and key, the portals as green pipes and the Krank as a Paper Mario and Paper Cappy from Super Mario Odyssey.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“We can feel your love for Mario in this piece. Not only have you customised the Toy-Con House, but all of the different attachments as well! A lot of work has clearly gone into this, and the Mario on the Crank Block is a lovely touch! What's more, looking closely at the screen we can see the strange creature inside has a moustache, and there are even some mushrooms too! Hats off to you for such a thorough customisation!”

Racer Game

by Arthur from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“This is Arthur's Toy-Con Garage Creation, 'The Racer'! 'The Racer' is similar to the Australian sport of Beach Flags. It is fun, competitive and physical!”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“The lanes are really nice and colourful and look like a lot of fun to race down. While the mechanic is straightforward—the first person to race to the controller and press the button wins—we think you've done a great job of implementing it in a fun way! Well done on combining real movement with Toy-Con so well!”

Mario’s Cabin

by Logan from Australia

Entrant’s description:

“This is my custom decorated Toy-Con called Mario’s cabin.”

What the Nintendo Labo development team said:

“This looks like a log cabin no matter which angle you look at it from. In customising this piece, you've done a great job selecting your materials to produce the wood effect. We loved the pipe chimney too! No doubt it would be a lot of fun to get into the house through that!”